Posts Tagged With: Day Dreams Book

17 Jan 1924 – Valentino A Writer?

We just received two books by Rudolph Valentino. One shows the practical man, while the other is the product of an aesthetic mood.  The titles are “How You Can Keep Fit” and “Daydreams”.  The fit book is straightaway prose and its character maybe judged by the following chapter headings:  The Foundation of Strength Is a Good Back, You are Judged By Your Chest and Your Shoulders and Let Your Abdomen Have the Strength of Iron Bands”.  But Mr. Valentino does not derive from Sparta alone.  He can turn quite readily from deep breathing to soft sighing.  Even though he chins himself 50 times a morning in front of an open window, languor still creeps in his life.  It is “Daydreams” that we find “Three Generations of Kisses” “Morphia” and “The Philosophy of a Pessimist”.  Apparently, a good circulation is not enough to keep a man from gloomy thoughts. Many a melting heart beats behind an abdomen of iron.  A man may touch his toes 100 times and yet find that he cannot put a finger upon the intangible.  If Valentino wins a permanent place in our literature, he is going to cause all sorts of trouble for the commentators of succeeding generations.  Two schools of criticism will rise out the conflict.  One will content that Valentino is the literary heir of Shelly, while the other will maintain that he has picked up the torch of Walter Camp.  And both schools will be right. To us the poetic Valentino is more appealing than the stern ascetic who writes: “The truth is that in order to keep the human body strong, flexible and in tip-top shape one simply must keep up enough physical activity to insure a maximum of condition.  Just as soon as one becomes lazy or careless, he begins to slip back.  There is no reason why one should slip back.  There is no reason indeed, but genius is neither logical nor reasonable.  Pagan man knew is neither logical nor reasonable.  Pagan man knew that inconsistency was an attribute of the gods and demigods. Great Jupiter had a good back and shoulders and chest above reproach, but he did break training upon occasion.  And so, it is with Rudolph Valentino. He has been careless, at the very least, or he could hardly have penned the bitter lament which occurs in the opening stanzas of “Cremation”:  “Just a packet of letters tied with a bit of blue; Just a packet of letters, that once were sent by you. To one who proved unworthy of the love inscribed within the tiny packet of letters, a witness of my sin”. Consider still another contrast between Valentino the prophet of Puritanism and Valentino the Bacchic of the groves. We quote first from “How to Keep Fit” “When working in pictures in California, I make it my business to be in bed by 1030, if not sooner.  Ten thirty is the extreme limit.  To stay up any later than that is dissipation in its most exaggerated form.  Only a few big yearly events ever tempt me to ignore this retiring hour of 1030; at least when working in pictures. The truth is that I could not keep up with the exacting demands of my work otherwise.  In California, I always arise at 6 o’clock and then put in about 45 minutes in my gymnasium at boxing, wrestling, and throwing the medicine ball.  After such a workout I have a shower.  The task of reconciling these apparent contradictions is beyond us.  We give up and leave the problem, “Rudolph Valentino May or Myth” to the ages.  For that is where it belongs

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1923 – Editor Gossips

Motion picture stars have written biographies since the beginning of the industry.  While Rudolph Valentino is not about to publish his he is about to publish a book of verse called “Reflections”. It is to be very attractively bound in Chinese Red and lettered in gold and black.  This editor has conveniently seen the dummies, and the contents poetry from his own pen; some of it written to various people and some of it various things.  We venture a prophecy the love lyrics of Rudolph Valentino will not be left on the shelves of local bookstops for long. heir sale will be tremendous and after all, what could be more fitting and proper than love versus from the pen of Valentino?

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12 Aug 1923 – Valentino Sifts Ashes of his Dead Loves with Poetry

“To rake over the dead ashes of a burnt out love one must use the pen point of poetry” –Rudolph Valentino.

Behold the sensitive soul of a Sheik, self-revealed to a world of worshippers. Rudolph Valentino master lover of the silver screen, forcibly exiled from film land, declares he has found consolation in the Muse of Poetry.  A volume of poems and epigrams bearing his signature has just been published.  Flaming orange, symbolic of passions torch, contrasted with the black of disillusion, appropriately clothe the slender sheaf of verse in which the screen troubadour sings his first serenade to the public.  “Day Dreams” he modestly calls his offering. “Just dreams a bit of romance, a bit of sentimentalism, a bit of philosophy”.  They were written, he tells us during his enforced inactivity, “to forget the tediousness of worldly strife”.

“I am a slave, yet free as birds above, Sold into bondage by the tender kiss of love”

Sings Rudolph, the adored of a million maidens. Love indeed, is the stuff that makes up most of the Sheik’s dreams. Among all the love inspired stanzas that Valentino has penned in words as ardent as the glances and embraces which have won him his title as screenland’s champion lover, not a single offering is dedicated to his present wife.  The initials of Winifred Hudnut, step=daughter of the millionaire, and known to the stage as Natacha Rambova, are conspicuous by their absence.  But her are dedications galore to others, whose identity is veiled behind the non-committal initials: “M”, “B”, “O”, “MK”, “AT” “EB” “GS” and “J”. Still more mystifying is the dedication of the whole book “To J.C.N.G. my friends here and there”.  Trying to fit these initials to well-known personages of the screen and artistic world will be one of the favorite indoor sports of the season, guaranteed to start a lively discussion anywhere. Shakespeare has kept the world guessing over four centuries in regard to the identity of a certain dark lady of this celebrated sonnets. Now comes Rudolph with his dozen or more mysterious affinities to puzzle the public.  Who is the fortunate friend whose inspirations has led the Romeo of filmland to protest: “Possessing the jewels of the earth, Holding within my grasp the scepter of the universe, all these would but make me more the pauper.  Were, I beggared of your love”? Who is E.B.? who will be envied by damsels all over the country, when they read the plea of her tempestuous wooer: “O Love, when you leave me, do not say rather, beloved of my heart, we will meet at sunshine tomorrow,” A kingdom for a key to the secrets locked up behind those initials, Mr. Valentino! A thousand lovers rolled into one and you have the romance make-up of the inner Valentino as revealed by his verses.  Sometimes he naively declares:

“Till we kiss our lips, of the mate of our soul. We will never know love has reached its goal.” More often he is the sophisticated Don Juan, reflecting cynically: “I do not care for anything that comes easily, It never lasts I know, but I fell in love with you easily. But not lastingly I know”.   Then inconsistently enough, he turns to reproach someone else for being just as fickle.  But enough of the offerings laid so generously on the altar of love. They fulfill the promise of the Valentino who thrilled the nation as the on-screen lover of Alice Terry, Nazimova, Agnes Ayres, Nita Naldi, Patsy Miller, Gloria Swanson. A many sided personality emerges from the orange covers of “Day Dreams”.   Day dreaming Rudolph is the life-story of the actor-dancer-poet, with many a flash-back into the days of discouragement and disillusion of the first eight years, in America.  It is the struggle of the unknown Italian youth in a strange land that lives again in the verses between the pages of this book.  Many of the lyrics owe their inspiration to Nature.  Rudolph’s intimate knowledge of growing things comes from his early training as an agriculturist, and recalls the humble past of the future Sheik who left the fruitful farms of his native Italy to work in America as a landscape gardener.  Religion plays an important part in the nature of worship of Valentino, who sees God’s handiwork everywhere, and pays tribute to its observations. It’s a sad, sad, world to Rudolph Valentino despite all the popularity that has come to him in the past two years. The author of “Day Dreams” if his revelations are to be considered as bona fide, is a young man who takes himself and his art seriously. His verses are filled with melancholy. The idol of the world of movie fans doesn’t seem very much thrilled by his sudden attainment of the pinnacles of success.  Far from being satisfied with things as they are “Happiness you wait for us Just beyond, Just beyond. We know not where, nor how we shall find you. We only know you are waiting, waiting just beyond”.

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27 Jun 43 Who Really Wrote Day Dreams Book of Poetry

Mention of a book of verse called “Day Dreams” bearing the name of Rudolph
Valentino bearing the name of Rudolph Valentino, movie actor as author brought a footnote from Phillip Richard Davis who has also written a book or two of verse. He says: Some collectors seek this rare item because the verses attributed to Valentino were really written by Gordon Seagrove, former Chicago Tribune Reporter.  “Day Dreams{ was a press agents idea to augment the build-up of Valentino into a national heart throb. Also it was at that time he was having problems with the movie studios so this was extra money. Seagrove did the writing in a few days. Ask Vincent Starrett about Seagrove as Valentino’s ghost writer. He ought to remember; he was also approached for the job.  Seagrove was a first class minor poet in a gusty and humorous way. He was a frequent contributor to the Tribune Line typo column in the 1920’s.  In book form, however, his writings are only available in Valentino’s “Day Dreams” and in link book back numbers.
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25 Jul 1943 – A Bookman’s Holiday By Charles Collins

It was said, that Rudolph Valentino’s book of verses, “Day Dreams” was ghost writed by Gordon Seagrove, former Chicago Tribune reporter and thereafter an advertising stylist, it was slightly off the track. The truth in a nugget is that Mr. Seagrove nearly wrote “Day Dreams”. The inside story, in his own words, is better than the original.  “I didn’t write one line of ‘Day Dreams’ says the erstwhile skipper of the yacht Vanadis,” and if I did I would be glad to atone for it on the scaffold. But..when the great lover was becoming a biological urge I saw him in a dancing exhibition, I think in the Bismarck Gardens. When he ended his program countless frustrated mommas took off their wrist watches, rings, etc. and threw them on the stage.  That did something to me. How, I pondered, could Seagrove get some of those coconuts? So he hatched up a scheme for a deluxe volume of love poetry by Valentino, to be written and published by himself (Gordon Seagrove), and submitted to the Great Lover who said “Yes”. A serious accident in the Mackinac yacht race delayed the ambitious Seagrove, but after he had been patched up in the hospital ‘all bound with woolen string and wires” he began to write the poems. “It was Eddie Guest with allot of hot Italian background says Seagrove, “a whiff of the desert and a dash of ‘pale hands I loved beside the Shalimar”.  All in all, it was good, heart-mellowing stuff, calculated to knock the matrons not into one loop but three.  In due course, the verses were sent to Hollywood and approved.  “But here the dirty hand of romance smote me.  Valentino had met and fallen in love with Winifred Hudnut, also known as Natacha Rambova. This lady, who was a pallid kind of poet of the E.F. Cummings incoherent school, took one look at my meaty efforts and vetoed them forthwith.  She substituted her own stuff, which now appears in Day Dreams – a new love in versification, in my opinion..  Rudolph Valentino was also the alleged author of a volume of memoirs called “My Private Diary” issued by the Occult Publishing Company, Chicago in 1929. It’s ghost writer has not yet confessed but I can tell you Rudolph Valentino did not write this book but Natacha Rambova who should get the writers credit.

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25 Jul 1943 – A Bookman’s Holiday By Charles Collins

It was said, that Rudolph Valentino’s book of verses, “Day Dreams” was ghost writed by Gordon Seagrove, former Chicago Tribune reporter and thereafter advertising stylist, it was slightly off the track. The truth in a nugget is that Mr. Seagrove nearly wrote “Day Dreams”. The inside story, in his own words, is better than the original.  “I didn’t write one line of ‘Day Dreams’ says the erstwhile skipper of the yacht Vanadis,” and if I did I would be glad to atone for it on the scaffold. But..when the great lover was becoming a biological urge I saw him in a dancing exhibition, I think in the Bismarck Gardens. When he ended his program countless frustrated mommas took off their wrist watches, rings, etc and threw them on the stage.  That did something to me. How, I pondered, could Seagrove get some of those coconuts? So he hatched up a scheme for a deluxe volume of love poetry by Valentino, to be written and published by himself (Gordon Seagrove), and submitted to the Great Lover who said “Yes”. A serious accident in the Mackinac yacht race delayed the ambitious Seagrove, but after he had been patched up in the hospital ‘all bound with woolen string and wires” he began to write the poems. “It was Eddie Guest with allot of hot Italian background says Seagrove, “a whiff of the desert and a dash of ‘pale hands I loved beside the Shalimar”.  All in all, it was good, heart-mellowing stuff, calculated to knock the matrons not into one loop but three.  In due course, the verses were sent to Hollywood and approved.  “But here the dirty hand of romance smote me.  Valentino had met and fallen in love with Winifred Hudnut, also known as Natacha Rambova. This lady, who was a pallid kind of poet of the E.F. Cummings incoherent school, took one look at my meaty efforts and vetoed them forthwith.  She substituted her own stuff, which now appears in Day Dreams – a new love in versification, in my opinion..  Rudolph Valentino was also the alleged author of a volume of memoirs called “My Private Diary” issued by the Occult Publishing Company, Chicago in 1929. It’s ghost writer has not yet confessed but I can tell you Rudolph Valentino did not write this book.

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27 Jun 43 – Who Really Wrote Day Dreams Book of Poetry

Mention of a book of verse called “Day Dreams” bearing the name of Rudolph Valentino movie actor as author brought a footnote from Phillip Richard Davis who has also written a book or two of verse. He says: Some collectors seek this rare item because the verses attributed to Valentino were really written by Gordon Seagrove, former Chicago Tribune Reporter.  “Day Dreams{ was a press agents idea to augment the build-up of Valentino into a national heart throb. Also it was at that time he was having problems with the movie studios so this was extra money. Seagrove did the writing in a few days. Ask Vincent Starrett about Seagrove as Valentino’s ghost writer. He ought to remember; he was also approached for the job.  Seagrove was a first class minor poet in a gusty and humorous way. He was a frequent contributor to the Tribune Line O’type column in the 1920’s.  In book form, however, his writings are only available in Valentino’s “Day Dreams” and in link book back numbers.

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28 Nov 1924-A Movie Poet

Rudolph Valentino, the cinema actor, is a poet. He. is publishing a collection of short poems in a volume entitled ‘Day Dreams.’ If Valentino’s verses are as ‘soulful’ as he endeavours to make his acting at times, his feminine admirers will experience further emotional thrills.

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daydreams 1924

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