Monthly Archives: February 2017

2 Nov 1925 – Pola Entertains

Pola Negri entertained in honor of Michael Arlen with a dinner dance at the Biltmore. As predicted this was the very beginning of emerald no to say very verdant social affairs in Cinema land, where charming people have gathered the past week and worn “green hats”. Miss Negri’s affair was distinguished and comme il faut as those of this delightful hostess always are.  The Arlenesque motif was emphasized more than in the green hats in which green ice cream was served.  In a gown of pale green duchess satin trimmed with rhinestones and black velvet wearing emeralds and diamonds as adorning jewels, the hostess received thirty guests in an embowered suite, the prevailing flowers being bronze and yellow chrysanthemums arranged with a profusion of maidenhair fern to give again the green motif.  Training the cloth of the long table were thirty yards of ribbon made from saucy-faced pansies pale yellow roses and maidenhair. Green candles marked the table at intervals in jade and alabaster candlesticks. Dining and dancing were the order of the evening and among those who participated in the festivity in addition to the hosts and honor guest was Rudolph Valentino, Mr & Mrs. Charles Eyton, Mr.  & Mrs. Frank Elliot, Mr & Mrs. Manuel Reachi, Mr. & Mrs. St Clair, MAJ Fullerton Weaver, Sid Grauman, M. Cimini, Mme Cimini, Ralph Block.  Following the day of Miss Negri’s party, Mr. and Mrs. Frank Borzage were host and hostess at the usual Sunday morning bridle-path party. But this time the affair was in honor of the lion of Cinemaland, whose roar is assiduously sought. At least, until another lion comes this way.  After a long cantor through Griffith Park bridle paths an outdoor buffet breakfast was served in the park. Glimpsed along the autumn paths in addition to Mr. Arlen and the hosts were Bebe Daniels, Mrs. Phyllis Daniels, Rudolph Valentino, Mr. and Mrs. Harold Lloyd, Ben White, Marie Mosquini, Mrs. Joseph Sanders, Ed Kane, Mr. and Mrs., William Howard, William Collier, Irving Thalberg, Mrs. H.G. Rogers, Kathleen Clifford, M.P. Illich, Ray Owens.  Following the return canter the entire party gathered at the Borzage home where they were joined by Julia Faye, Mr. and Mrs. Dave Butler, Roy Stewart, Mr. Borzage’s brother William who contributed to the incidental musical entertainment featured throughout the day. Luncheon was served buffet.
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19 Apr 1923 – Valentino Statement

Rudolph Valentino former motion picture star, now touring the country dancing, was criticized for his alleged statement that motion pictures today have little consideration for morality. Jacob Silverman of Altoons opposed Sunday opening of film houses, saying the only ones who benefit by Sunday movie shows are the picture producers, and that everyone is entitled to 52 holidays a year.

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20 Feb 1964 Cugat Cites Valentino

Xavier Cugat says that Rudolph Valentino gave him the impetus to change from being a newspaper artist to a band leader.  Cugat started out as a concert violinist.  At 12 years of age, he was concert master in Havana, Cuba and told himself that if he wasn’t the world’s greatest violinist by the time he was 25, he would quit. He wasn’t, and so he did. Cugat  took up cartooning. He was a staff artist on a Los Angeles paper, and one of his assignments was to sketch Valentino. The actor liked Cugat’s cartoon and they became friends. “Valentino danced the tango”, Cugat says, in “The Four Horsemen of the Apocalypse”. It was a silent movie, and it became popular.  “So he suggested that I start a tango orchestra”.  I  did, and our first engagement was the Coconut Grove. “Valentino came into dance, and so did Joan Crawford. We were an immediate hit. “It got so the establishment had to have mounted policemen outside to hold the crowds back”. That Cugat says, is the genuine truth about how he became a band leader.

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17 Feb 1922 Valentino’s Make-up Deceptive

Rudolph Valentino reputed to be one of the screen’s handsomest actors can look hard-boiled enough when the occasion demands. Valentino was in San Francisco playing the leading male role in exterior scenes of George Melford’s Paramount Picture “Moran of the Lady Letty” featuring Dorothy Dalton, showing at the Imperial Theater today and tomorrow. Starting for his room in one of the Bay Area’s most palatial hotel after a hard day’s work in his rough sailor attire, he was stopped by an elevator starter. “Here you” said the man, “do you stay at this hotel”? “Why yes,” smiled Valentino “why do you ask”? “You look like a smuggler” replied the starter. “Thank you for the compliment” returned the actor. “That’s just what I want to look like. My make-up must be very realistic”. It certainly is said the elevator man, who had discerned the grease paint on Valentino’s face, and recognized him.

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14 Feb 1952 Valentino’s Valentine

14 Feb was the perfect day to learn that Edna Stansbury, has been chosen one of Rudolph Valentino’s Valentines. The modern version of the heart-throb of the Flapper Era, Anthony Dexter, was this year’s judge for the 1952 Valentine Girl and her court of sweethearts. Candidates for the honors numbered 760 representatives of Beta Sigma Phi sororities throughout the U.S. and Canada. Dexter chose Mrs. Pat Lawrence a member of California Kappa Nii Chapter at Gendale, as Valentine Girl. Miss Stanbury, named one of the 5th Valentines and her portrait published in the Torch of Beta Sigma Phi. She was also offered a job as a sorority organizer for Nu Phi Mu. The younger group of business women. Had she been able to accept the work she would have toured the United States and Canada helping form Nu Phi Mu chapters. Miss Stansbury was chosen by Theta Chapter of Greely to represent her group but only for her beauty but sparking personality and service to the sorority. She is the daughter of Mr and Mrs. J.W. Stansbury and works for a Fruit and Vegetable Inspection Service.

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13 Feb 1922 Valentine’s Day Gets New Meaning

Tuesday, 14 Feb, Valentines Day will also be Rudolph Valentino Day at the New Astor. The popular young star’s picture, “The Sheik” has returned for another downtown run at this theater and to celebrate its second Minneapolis showing. Valentino has sent 5,000 Valentines by special train to the city to be presented to feminine fans who attend the theater on that day. The similarity between the name “Valentino” and “Valentine’s Day” prompted the star to send the gifts.

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10 Feb 1922 – Valentino’s 3 Rules for Love

1. Never play at love unless you feel the urge. Insincere lovemaking is cheating and you cheat yourself most of all.

2. Never try cave-man tactics on the woman you love. That’s a sure way to lose her if she is worth winning.

3. Be patient. Never try to kiss a woman at the first or second time you meet her. And never reveal your purpose, whatever it may be, until she is used to you and trusts you.

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25 Aug 1926 – Spent Money as fast as he could make it

 

Rudolph Valentino earned approximately $2,000,000 during his brief film career, he was usually without money. Joseph Schenck, executive director of United Artists Corporation for which Valentino made pictures said today. The potential earning power of the man who thrilled the romantic imagination of screen fans was easily a million dollars a year. Mr. Schenck asserted, but his net estate, so far is known, does not exceed $75,000. Valentino was just beginning to realize large earnings in the last two years Mr. Schenck said, “I should say that in the last year and a quarter he made between $900,000 and a million dollars in pictures. He made perhaps two million dollars during his entire screen career. “Rudy made no investments. He lived well, spending freely, and was exceedingly generous with his friends”. I know he never had any money, regardless of his earnings. He didn’t know its value. Valentino had taken out a personal insurance policy for $50,000, Mr. Schenck said, with is brother and sister as beneficiaries. United Artists Corporation had insured him for $200,000 Valentino had made a will, which is now in Hollywood, according to George Ullman, the late actor’s manager.

 

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14 Jul 1923 Rudolph Valentino Praises Mineralava

Mr. Rudolph Valentino is reported to be coming back like Napoleon as the Flapper’s Presidential Candidate for 1924 on the Platform that he can star in every Movie News Reel, launching a Battleship. Now comes the announcement that Valentino praises Mineralava the facial clay used at exclusive Barber Shops all over the Country and sold in the Hudson Toilet Goods Shop.

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