Posts Tagged With: Rudolph Valentino

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Feb 1922 – Letter to Editor

Dearest Editor,

As an old reader from your publication, I am herewith taking the wonderful opportunity to say something on the subject concerning some of my favourite actors and actresses.  I would like to take a moment to congratulate the movie industry for the great progress and better pictures made during this past year which is due to the fact of the new types being introduced to the public.  Rudolph Valentino, Colleen Moore, Glen Hunter, Richard Dix, and scores of others responsible for cleaner and better pictures.  I predict in the future this might change but for now I remain a fan and wishing all success.

Very Truly, Blanche Kate, NY

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12 Feb 1927 – Valentino is a Russian Hero

Will Rudolph Valentino do for the Russian what he did for the Latin? Meaning, will he make us thing of the romantic male when a Russian is mentioned? Ever since Rudy glided through “The Four Horsemen” and cut a great big niche for himself in the cinema hall of fame we have thought of Spaniards and Argentinians whenever the discussion led to heart flutters. We even think of “sheiks” as being of Latin persuasion. All of which speculation is due to the fact Valentino is appearing as a Russian in “The Eagle,” a glamorous film showing at the Liberty theater Sunday and Monday. Vilma Hanky, famous Hungarian beauty, plays opposite the star. Louise Dresser, noted stage and vaudeville star for years, has a featured role as the Czarina.

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Feb 1922 – On the Camera Coast

There were more world potenates at the opening of Marcus Lowe’s new movie theater in Los Angeles than there were at the disarmament conference in Washington. Some people may have heard of Marshal Foch but they would break their necks to see him the way they did to behold Gloria Swanson in person.  The interior of the theater is by far the most beautiful piece of architecture in Los Angeles. It is of Spanish renaissance, the chief decorator being the users who wear mantillas and high combs. I thought them more beautiful than the movie stars, but of course everyone to his own taste. Fred Niblo was master of ceremonies and he may not be so famous as Foch but I’ll say he is just as brave.  Rudolph Valentino did not show because he is refusing to make personal appearances. Gloria Swanson made a bow from her orchestra seat and the spotlight fell on Constance Talmadge who arose and smiled about a thousand dollars worth.  Movie players Betty Compson, Anita Sterwart, Viola Dane, Alice Lake, Tom Mix, Harold Lloyd, Wesley Barry, Jackie Coogan, Doris May, May McAvoy, Bustor Keaton when introduced all took their respective bows.  The show was late in starting and the night was magical and no one disappointed except the one who refused to show up in support.

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3 Feb 1926 – Hollywood is Laughing at Pola on trip to New Mexico

Hollywood is enjoying a laugh at the expense of Pola Negri in connection with a sudden trip to Albuquerque, New Mexico, on ‘‘oil business.” The film star, it was told by friends, was meeting Rudolph Valentino studio officials, on learning of the trip, wired to return immediately to avoid a publicity scandal. When she arrived in Albuquerque, she was greeted by a dozen reporters and informed there was no oil there. She started back to Hollywood. Upon his arrival here on his way to California, Rudolph Valentino denied he was engaged to Pola Negri and knew nothing about her trip to New Mexico. Valentino asserted he did not know Miss Negri intimately. Pola arrived at Albuquerque at midnight for business reasons, she said, and left at once. The incident gave rise to rumors that the two were to meet and be married.

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28 Jan 1924 -Carmel Myers

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27 Jan 1926

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25 Jan 1922 – Hollywood Invites Sarah Earnhardt to 10th Anniversary

Hollywood has invited Madame Sarah Earnhardt to attend the tenth anniversary of the birth of the feature motion picture. The following cablegram has been filed to the famous actress at her home in Paris: “We, as representatives of American motion picture art, invite you to visit America to be honor guest In nationwide celebration of tenth birthday of feature motion picture. This invitation is in recogniton of tact that you were frst as you have been greatest artist to lend your genius to establish motion picture as art. “Your example ten years ago in creating ‘Queen Elizabeth,’ first feature picture, gave this new art impetus which has carried it it Us position’ as most important entertainment of world. Your appearance in ‘Queen Elizabeth’was inspiration to motion pictures as your appearance on speaking stage always has been inspiration to drama.” The cablegram bore the following signatures of Hollywood Elite: William DeMille. chairman; Rex Ingram, Wallace Reid. Mary Pickford, Gloria Swanson, Anita Stewart, George Melford, Douglas Fairbanks, Agnes Ayres, Guy Bates Post, William S. Hart, Penrhyn Stanlaws, Maurice Tourneur, Elinor Glyn, Betty Compact;, Norman Talmadge, Dorothy Dalton, .William D. Taylor, Constance Talmadge, Jack Holt, Theodore Kosloft, Douglas Mac Lean, Clayton Hamilton, Mary Miles Minter, Clara Beranger, Bebe Daniels, Buster Keaton, May McAvoy, Constance Binney, * Pauline Frederick, Theodore Roberts, John M. Stahl, Thomas Meighan, Charles Chaplin, Rudolph Valentino, Richard Walton, Tully, and June Mathis.

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1922 – Big Bear Lake

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This article talks about a favorite destination of the rich and famous. The connection to Rudolph Valentino is in 1926 he took Pola Negri here and stayed overnight in one of the cabins.

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26 Dec 1923 – Valentino Coming Back

With all differences patched up and with a brand new spelling for his first name Rudolph Valentino will begin work immediately after the holiday season on a film version of Booth Tarkington’s Monsieur Beaucaire.  Famous Players-Lasky are again his employers.  When he formerly toiled before the cameras he was known as Rodolph.  Reading the latest contract one finds the signature Rudolph with no explanation for the name change.  Recently Ritz Carlton Pictures corporation announced he signed with them to begin work on a series of new films as soon as his contract with Famous Players ran out.  In the latter contract, owever, was a clause giving them the option on the players services.  They decided to exercise this option and after long negotiations through his attorney Max Steuer succeeded in their attempt to win back the famous actor.  An official of Famous Players-Lasky said today, the company had tried several times in the last year to settle the matter, offering Valentino cart blanche to seletct his stories, director, and virtually name his salary. they had extreme difficulty in negotiating with him directly and rapprochement was only reached through Mr. Steuer.  By the terms of the settlement all litigation between Valentino and Famous Players will be dropped.  Mrs. Valentino as attorney in fact for her husband said she played an important part. Before sailing for Europe this last week after she had affixed her signature to the contract. Mrs. Valentino said “It is gratifying to reach a satifactory conclusion and to see Rudolph again in a position to pursue his career under satisfactory conditions.  Some sample screen tests were made while we were abroad and the results demonstrated conclusively the character development and artistic advance made by him since he previously appeared.  In all respects he is fit and ready for his new tasks”.

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25 Dec 1923 – Letter to the Editor

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Dear Editor,

I have been reflecting on today with families coming together appreciating , family, hearth, and love for fellow man. This time of year, when people count their blessings and celebrate the birth of Jesus. I cannot but help and wonder about a certain silent film star who achieved the American dream of fame, fortune, friends. A man who touches others’ lives through a movie screen presence and yet does not appreciate the good things that came his way.  Rudolph Valentino is a man whose reality does not match up to the persona. Did the year, really give Mr. Valentino the desires of his heart? In 1922, he achieved success with his movie “Blood and Sand” making more money than the year before. There is the new wife who seemed to have his best interests at heart. But biting the hand that literally feeds you and listening to bad advice did not do him any good.  This year, he cleverly found a way to make money, and it did not endear him with his fans with his antics when him and his wife travelled from city to city.  These are hard-working people who paid dearly to see their movie idol perform and yet all I read about was his complaining.  Mr. Valentino in the spirit of this special day, I ask that you reflect on your actions and realize your no more different than the next person.  The day where fame found you can leave and what will you have to show? Just a name in the newspapers from a bygone age.  May you read this in the spirit in which is intended that I wish you good tidings and hope that the next year is a better one.

Regards,

Rev James Tolerville, Canterville, Ohio

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Jan 1926 – Divorced Finalized

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1920 – Eyes of Youth

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27 Nov 1925 – Natacha Rambova Seeks Divorce

Winifred Valentino through her mother, yesterday confirmed the reports that she had instituted a suit for divorce in Paris from Rudolph Valentino on the grounds that he refuses to live with her.
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16 Aug 1946 – Falcon Lair Needs a New Owner

Actress Ann Harding who bought the Rudolph Valentino estate “Falcon Lair” for $75,000, didn’t like the place and sold it after five months for $125,000 to a San Francisco night club owner who doesn’t like it either because he doesn’t live in it.

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24 Nov 1924 – Movie Review “Sainted Devil”

Memories of brave little Cigarette in “Under Two Flags” came to our mind as we viewed the passing shadows unfolding the story of Gloria Swanson’s latest pictorial effort, “The Wages of Virtue,” which is adorning the Rivoli screen this week. With its background of the headquarters of a contingent of the Foreign Legion in Algiers, this photoplay unlocks a flood of thoughts regarding the blighted lives of many of the men in this heterogeneous mass of humanity, who are burying their identities under a French uniform in the blazing sun of Northern Africa. This idea has not been forgotten in this celluloid presentation, as one sees an east side New Yorker, an Italian strong man, an English crackshot, a Parisian apache and an American college graduate among the men busy in the barracks. You see them polishing buttons and cartridge cases, cleaning their tunics and boots, it being set forth in the regulations (whether they be murderers, forgers, or only the victims of love affairs) that their accoutrements must be glistening and immaculate.
Lithe and vivacious, with swiftly changing moods, Miss Swanson plays the part of Carmelita, the girl who mothers the regiment of gruff soldiers and in a dilettante manner presides over a café, to which the nondescript volunteers come to forget their disappointments or misdeeds with a cheering glass of cheap wine. Carmelita is filled with the joie de vivre, and is able even to get fun out of her sweeping and dusting. She performs her ablutions in a drinking fountain, and looks forward to the hour when the thick voiced fighters are due to sit at the tables or stand in the bar of the café. Marvin, whose sobriquet is Yankee Blue, one evening takes Carmelita in his arms, and misunderstanding her violent struggles, he snatches several kisses. Luigi (Ivan Linow), a brawny giant, who saved Carmelita from drowning, is a brute who pretends to be in love with Carmelita while he is flirting with the matronly cantinière. He lays in wait for Marvin (Ben Lyon), and after Marvin has been badly beaten he is sent to the military jail, where in the scorching sun he is made to march with heavy packs. Carmelita, in a huge sun-bonnet under which is concealed a bottle of wine, goes forth to procure Marvin’s freedom. She is in love with the handsome American, and he reciprocates her affection. Miss Swanson is particularly good where she pretends to have fallen down a flight of steps in a faint, just as Marvin, after being freed, is entering her café. She takes her audience into her confidence by winking at them when Marvin is not looking, and closing her eyes the instant he lets his gaze fall upon her face. This story was adapted from one written by Captain Percival Christopher Wren. It seems to us that the dénouement would have been stronger if Luigi were a better character. He saves the girl’s life, and yet she in the end plunges a knife into his back because he has beaten Marvin. The men of the Foreign Legion swear that they will not reveal the fact that Carmelita killed the giant, all agreeing to testify that he was slain by Arabs. It is a strange idea, first, to have Luigi a hero, when he saved Carmelita from a watery grave, and then to make him a murderer, by having him throw a little fiddler into the river, for suggesting to Carmelita that she and he go to Paris. Even after this one does not lose sympathy with Luigi, as he insists that the deed was done because of the musician’s poisonous ideas. It would have been more pleasing to have another villain and to make Luigi a sort of good father, or guardian, to Carmelita. It is also problematical, especially in motion pictures, whether it is wise to have the heroine kill the villain, even under such conditions as Carmelita slew the strong man. Mr. Lyon is efficient in the rôle of the hero, and Mr. Linow is splendid as Luigi. Norman Trevor delivers a sympathetic performance as the English crack shot, known in the regiment as John Boule.
Allan Dwan directed this picture, which, we must say, is just as interesting as “Manhandled,” his previous production with Miss Swanson.
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22 Nov 1924 – Two Brokers Try to End Their Suit Against Rudolph Valentino

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The application of Elizabeth Reilley who is assignee of the claims of Clifford Robertson and Eugene Webb, Theatrical Brokers, Los Angeles for $50,000 in comissions from Rudolph Valetnino to drop the suit was argued before Justice Gavegan in Supreme Court.  Robertson and Webb were the agents who signed Valentino to Famous Players-Laskey Corporation in 1921 for a salary of $1,250 a week.  They sued for commissions, which they said were due even though the contract was not lived up to by the Sheik.  Objection to the discontinuance of the action was made for Valentino by Max Steur, his attorney.  He was no longer repped by Arthur Butler Graham who sued Mr. Valentino last year for services rendered during the same suit but was never paid.  The present lawyer contended Robertson and Webb contract to procure engagements for Valentino at the highest possible salary. He further sets forth before the agents tied his client to the Famous Players-Lasky contract there was concern they had received an offer of $5000 a week from Willis and Inglis other theatrical agents for Valentino’s services.  Robertson and Webb are charged with having failed to let Valentino know of this and similiar offers.  In his counterclaim Valetnino asks for $1, 004.333 in damages.   Justice reseved decision.

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1922 – Juan Duval and Rudolph Valentino

In 1897, Juan Xicart Bellavista was born in Spain and became a well-known Hollywood entertainer who held many roles such as: screen writer, tango, flamengo, apache dancer and actor.  At the age of 22, Mr. Bellavista immigrated to this country, where he changed his name to Juan Duval and the rest was Hollywood history.  Mr. Duval started his career as a fight choreographer hired by Metro to help Rudolph Valentino, for a movie scene in “Blood and Sand”.  Then in the late 1920’s Mr. Duval toured the Vaudeville circuit with the Richards twins with skits that featured dancing and music.  During one skit called “The Cave of Sorrows”, Mr. Duval would dance Apache.

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From there Mr. Duval made local headlines when he joined the Hollywood Studios of Stage, Arts and Music as a Tango dance instructor.

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On Oct 1941, Mr. Duval opened a successful Spanish dance studio located at 2209 Van Ness Ave, San Francisco.  In 1942 Mr. Duval became an American citizen.  On Apr 1954, Juan Duval died and is buried at L.A. National Veterans Cemetery. Mr. Duval was serving in the Army, during WWI fighting in North Africa.  In 1958, Mr. Duval’s wife filed a lawsuit on behalf of her late husband concerning the 1956, Academy Award winning movie “The Brave One”.  Mrs. Duval believed her late husband who was a writer for this movie filed both a breach of contract and copyright lawsuit.   The story goes Juan Duval wrote the original screen play and died before film production started. Seems the King Brothers and Dalton Trumbo took credit and got the oscar.  Of interest Dalton Trumbo was a blacklisted writer and one of the Hollywood 10 during the communistic period. To this day, google searches show Juan Duval’s family are still bitter about the fact their father never received the movie credit and Oscar he deserved.  There is not allot of facts that show Mr. Duval and Rudolph Valentino were friends of any kind.

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