Posts Tagged With: Rudolph Valentino

27 Nov 1925 – Natacha Rambova Seeks Divorce

Winifred Valentino through her mother, yesterday confirmed the reports that she had instituted a suit for divorce in Paris from Rudolph Valentino on the grounds that he refuses to live with her.
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16 Aug 1946 – Falcon Lair Needs a New Owner

Actress Ann Harding who bought the Rudolph Valentino estate “Falcon Lair” for $75,000, didn’t like the place and sold it after five months for $125,000 to a San Francisco night club owner who doesn’t like it either because he doesn’t live in it.

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24 Nov 1924 – Movie Review “Sainted Devil”

Memories of brave little Cigarette in “Under Two Flags” came to our mind as we viewed the passing shadows unfolding the story of Gloria Swanson’s latest pictorial effort, “The Wages of Virtue,” which is adorning the Rivoli screen this week. With its background of the headquarters of a contingent of the Foreign Legion in Algiers, this photoplay unlocks a flood of thoughts regarding the blighted lives of many of the men in this heterogeneous mass of humanity, who are burying their identities under a French uniform in the blazing sun of Northern Africa. This idea has not been forgotten in this celluloid presentation, as one sees an east side New Yorker, an Italian strong man, an English crackshot, a Parisian apache and an American college graduate among the men busy in the barracks. You see them polishing buttons and cartridge cases, cleaning their tunics and boots, it being set forth in the regulations (whether they be murderers, forgers, or only the victims of love affairs) that their accoutrements must be glistening and immaculate.
Lithe and vivacious, with swiftly changing moods, Miss Swanson plays the part of Carmelita, the girl who mothers the regiment of gruff soldiers and in a dilettante manner presides over a café, to which the nondescript volunteers come to forget their disappointments or misdeeds with a cheering glass of cheap wine. Carmelita is filled with the joie de vivre, and is able even to get fun out of her sweeping and dusting. She performs her ablutions in a drinking fountain, and looks forward to the hour when the thick voiced fighters are due to sit at the tables or stand in the bar of the café. Marvin, whose sobriquet is Yankee Blue, one evening takes Carmelita in his arms, and misunderstanding her violent struggles, he snatches several kisses. Luigi (Ivan Linow), a brawny giant, who saved Carmelita from drowning, is a brute who pretends to be in love with Carmelita while he is flirting with the matronly cantinière. He lays in wait for Marvin (Ben Lyon), and after Marvin has been badly beaten he is sent to the military jail, where in the scorching sun he is made to march with heavy packs. Carmelita, in a huge sun-bonnet under which is concealed a bottle of wine, goes forth to procure Marvin’s freedom. She is in love with the handsome American, and he reciprocates her affection. Miss Swanson is particularly good where she pretends to have fallen down a flight of steps in a faint, just as Marvin, after being freed, is entering her café. She takes her audience into her confidence by winking at them when Marvin is not looking, and closing her eyes the instant he lets his gaze fall upon her face. This story was adapted from one written by Captain Percival Christopher Wren. It seems to us that the dénouement would have been stronger if Luigi were a better character. He saves the girl’s life, and yet she in the end plunges a knife into his back because he has beaten Marvin. The men of the Foreign Legion swear that they will not reveal the fact that Carmelita killed the giant, all agreeing to testify that he was slain by Arabs. It is a strange idea, first, to have Luigi a hero, when he saved Carmelita from a watery grave, and then to make him a murderer, by having him throw a little fiddler into the river, for suggesting to Carmelita that she and he go to Paris. Even after this one does not lose sympathy with Luigi, as he insists that the deed was done because of the musician’s poisonous ideas. It would have been more pleasing to have another villain and to make Luigi a sort of good father, or guardian, to Carmelita. It is also problematical, especially in motion pictures, whether it is wise to have the heroine kill the villain, even under such conditions as Carmelita slew the strong man. Mr. Lyon is efficient in the rôle of the hero, and Mr. Linow is splendid as Luigi. Norman Trevor delivers a sympathetic performance as the English crack shot, known in the regiment as John Boule.
Allan Dwan directed this picture, which, we must say, is just as interesting as “Manhandled,” his previous production with Miss Swanson.
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22 Nov 1924 – Two Brokers Try to End Their Suit Against Rudolph Valentino

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The application of Elizabeth Reilley who is assignee of the claims of Clifford Robertson and Eugene Webb, Theatrical Brokers, Los Angeles for $50,000 in comissions from Rudolph Valetnino to drop the suit was argued before Justice Gavegan in Supreme Court.  Robertson and Webb were the agents who signed Valentino to Famous Players-Laskey Corporation in 1921 for a salary of $1,250 a week.  They sued for commissions, which they said were due even though the contract was not lived up to by the Sheik.  Objection to the discontinuance of the action was made for Valentino by Max Steur, his attorney.  He was no longer repped by Arthur Butler Graham who sued Mr. Valentino last year for services rendered during the same suit but was never paid.  The present lawyer contended Robertson and Webb contract to procure engagements for Valentino at the highest possible salary. He further sets forth before the agents tied his client to the Famous Players-Lasky contract there was concern they had received an offer of $5000 a week from Willis and Inglis other theatrical agents for Valentino’s services.  Robertson and Webb are charged with having failed to let Valentino know of this and similiar offers.  In his counterclaim Valetnino asks for $1, 004.333 in damages.   Justice reseved decision.

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1922 – Juan Duval and Rudolph Valentino

In 1897, Juan Xicart Bellavista was born in Spain and became a well-known Hollywood entertainer who held many roles such as: screen writer, tango, flamengo, apache dancer and actor.  At the age of 22, Mr. Bellavista immigrated to this country, where he changed his name to Juan Duval and the rest was Hollywood history.  Mr. Duval started his career as a fight choreographer hired by Metro to help Rudolph Valentino, for a movie scene in “Blood and Sand”.  Then in the late 1920’s Mr. Duval toured the Vaudeville circuit with the Richards twins with skits that featured dancing and music.  During one skit called “The Cave of Sorrows”, Mr. Duval would dance Apache.

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From there Mr. Duval made local headlines when he joined the Hollywood Studios of Stage, Arts and Music as a Tango dance instructor.

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On Oct 1941, Mr. Duval opened a successful Spanish dance studio located at 2209 Van Ness Ave, San Francisco.  In 1942 Mr. Duval became an American citizen.  On Apr 1954, Juan Duval died and is buried at L.A. National Veterans Cemetery. Mr. Duval was serving in the Army, during WWI fighting in North Africa.  In 1958, Mr. Duval’s wife filed a lawsuit on behalf of her late husband concerning the 1956, Academy Award winning movie “The Brave One”.  Mrs. Duval believed her late husband who was a writer for this movie filed both a breach of contract and copyright lawsuit.   The story goes Juan Duval wrote the original screen play and died before film production started. Seems the King Brothers and Dalton Trumbo took credit and got the oscar.  Of interest Dalton Trumbo was a blacklisted writer and one of the Hollywood 10 during the communistic period. To this day, google searches show Juan Duval’s family are still bitter about the fact their father never received the movie credit and Oscar he deserved.  There is not allot of facts that show Mr. Duval and Rudolph Valentino were friends of any kind.

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14 Nov 1949 – Language Lessons

Actor John Garfield is taking Italian Language Lessons from deceased Silent Film Star Rudolph Valentino’s brother Alberto.

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12 Nov 1925

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Nov 1925 – Valentino Seeks Citizenship here

Rudolph Guglielmi better known as silent movie star Rudolph Valentino called at the Federal Building, New York yesterday and took out his first citizenship papers.  William J. Burns, formerly with U.S. Secret Service, came along as his sponsor.  Mr. Valentino wore a mixed cray suit, a gray cravat, a gray hat with tan leather shoes.  To clerk Frank O’Grady, who put the usual questions to him, he said he said he was a motion picture player, five feet eleven inches tall and weighted 164 pounds. He further said, he was born in Castellaneta, Italy on 6 May 1895.  He lives at 270 Park Avenue, and came to this country from Genoa, Italy, his wife’s name is Winifred, born in Salt Lake City, Utah and now lives at 96th Street, New York City.  A statement sent out last night by the publicity agent of the United Artists Corporation, says that as the first step in his application for citizenship. Mr. Valentino presented an honorary discharge by the Italian government from all military duties past and present.  This action was taken, it was explained, because of a rumor current during the World War in Mr. Valentino’s home neighbourhood in Italy that he failed to enlist.  It is further explained Mr. Valentino’s failure to take part in the war was due to a slight defect in his left eye.  For this his offer of military services was refused.  This defect, it was stated, does not interfere with his motion picture work.  A year after his rejection by the Italian authorities, the statement says, Mr. Valentino tried to get into the British Aid Service, but Major Manchester of the British Recruiting Service rejected him presumably for the same reason as that which led to the refusal of his services for Italy.  Mr. Valentino again sought military service under the draft rules of the U.S. and when he was turned away, he made another unsuccessful effort to enter the Italian military service through the aid of the Italian Consul General.  After the war, Mr. Valentino heard from a brother whom he met in France that he was slated as a slacker in Taranto, Italy. This was found to be true, but it was discovered to be an error which was later corrected.  The statement says that Mr. Valentino delayed his application to become a citizen of this country until his record was cleared of all stain.  Mrs. Rudolph Valentino returned from Europe yesterday on the Leviathan under her professional name of Natacha Rambova, accompanied by her mother Mrs. Richard Hudnut and said she intended to start work on a picture play in New York immediately.  When it was pointed out to her that her husband stated to newspapers he wished her to leave the film business and make a home for him, the screen star smiled and said “ I will let him do the talking. I do not care to discuss my private affairs with the public”.  She further added it was her intention to keep in business as she had done before er marriage and that the next move would be up to her husband.

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31 Oct 1923 – Sir Arthur Conan Doyle, Mr. & Mrs. Valentino, and Spiritualism

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The 1920’s was a time period of social and economic change. People were tired of living a legacy of war and sorrow. They wanted to live life on their terms and not what society deemed as acceptable or tolerated. There was a hint of the curious in people. Eager to explore beyond their own backyards by going out into the world and try new things. But while these were deemed forbidden or taboo it didn’t stop the rich and famous. No, they led and mere mortals followed. For instance magic shows were something a sober upstanding and law abiding citizen would not normally attend. However, they became a public phenomenon and no one was more public and a forbidden marvel than Harry Houdini and his magic performances that made viewers believe. Also, people enjoyed participating in popular parlour board games such as seances or Ouija boards giving them a chance to communicate with the dearly departed. This too became a phenomenon making skeptics into believers. Lastly, Spiritualism became all the rage among many famous people or newly turned believers of the day.  Famous author and noted believer Sir Arthur Conan Doyle was a strong advocate and was often found to lecture on his theories and beliefs. So strong was his beliefs that he felt Houdini had supernatural skills and even when the magic trick was explain he refused to believe otherwise.  The author felt there was a commonality between spiritualism and motion picture industry. But let us not forget Doyle’s interest goes back further than Rudolph and Natacha.  During and after WWI Doyle was a member of the Society for Physical Research and became friends with all sorts of people with a shared intriguing interest.  Rambova’s interest started at a young age and believed strongly in reincarnation and automatic writing.  She surrounded herself with people that had a shared belief and was firm follower of Madame Helen Blavatsky. When she became involved with Rudolph Valentino, she shared her personal beliefs. During the course of their relationship he became an enthusiast and newspapers have documented the couple’s belief extensively.  June Mathis the woman who discovered him and other mother were also believers.  However, when Valentino’s marriage to Rambova ended so did his interest with spiritualism.  On his death bed he reconciled with the Roman Catholic faith. Rambova eventually reinvented herself as a world known Egyptologist and carried her belief to the grave.

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Sir Arthur Conan Doyle gave his final interview to Horace Leaf, published in October 1930 issue of Ghost Story.

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This interview seemed a culmination of Doyle’s fanaticism with spiritualism. The writer starts out writing Conan Doyle’s last words to me were “Spiritualism is the most important fact in life, and we must make this world accept it in the interests of both worlds”.  Towards the end of interview, he talked about how Doyle would talk to crowds about spiritualism and the mileage he traveled.  Sir Arthur Conan Doyle did make a promise and his final words were published in the New York Times that I have included in this blog post.

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There has been no evidence that suggests the Valentino’s ever personally met Sir Arthur Conan Doyle. But at one time, all had a shared interest, in spiritualism and the great beyond. How fascinating it would be to read about them having a conversation where they share opinions on mutual interests. The spiritualism movement continued into the early 1930’s and interest declined thereafter.

Happy 🎃 🎃 Halloween

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27 Oct 1953 – Famed Valentino Director Dies

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24 Oct 1923 – Defendant Answers

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23 Oct 1923 – Arthur Butler Graham vs. Rudolph Valentino Continues

According to court documents the ongoing trial of Arthur Butler Graham vs. Rudolph Valentino continued for most of the year 1923.  It’s a known fact that Rudolph Valentino had problems with paying his bills on time.  Looks like the amount went up to $65,000 for services rendered when Arthur represented him in court during the Famous Players-Lasky suit

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30 Sep 1921

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24 Sep 1921 – Valentino was a Dancer at Tails Cafe in San Francisco

During the presentation of “The Four Horsemen of the Apocalypse at the Lyric Theater last week, many Stocktonlans recalled they had seen Valentino, who played the part of Julio, some place, some time. Mr. Valentino made a tremendous hit in “The Four Horsemen” and. according to Stocktonians who have verified their recollections. he danced at Tail’s in San Francisco about eight years ago. Following his successful engagement at Tail’s Cafe he joined Mrs. Irene Castle as a dancing partner, and it was while with her company that he developed those abilities which he expresses in part to distinguish his portrayal of the life of Julio. After a highly successful week at the Lyric, Theater “The Four Horsemen of the Apocalypse,” closed last evening.

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23 Sep 1922 – Stolen Moments starring Rudolph Valentino

A picture that has aroused great interest and enthusiasm wherever shown “Stolen Moments” – a thrilling drama of a woman who was forced to decide whether to shield herself at the expense of her husbands honour or to bear the penalty herself. Rudolph Valentino and Marguerite Namara, the famous international celebrities, appear in the leading roles. It is a photo-drama that contains all the elements that proclaim dramatic supremacy marvelous scenery, incomparable acting and unusual story.
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20 Sep 1977

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17 Sep 1923 – Oh Horrors Girls Rodolfo is Baldo

Rodolfo Valentino, the Shiek of Shieks, arrived in Paris last week accompanied by his red-lipped wife Winifred Hudnut. He had a rousing reception from a large crowd and posed for almost an hour for photographs for French newspapers and photograph service, but one thing the Parisians found out that Americans have failed to notice. Rodolfo is bald. According to a dispatch carried in the Los Angeles Times there is no doubt about it. He is bald. Between the shining and lacquered flairs over his Apollo-like head gleams the unmistakable whiteness of Valentino’s skull. Three years hence those black hairs will not even l)e able to conceal the gaping spaces, so girls resign yourselves to the truth. Both the Valentinos unanimously and voiciferously declared to reporters that they are going to have their own company when they get back to America. Rodolfo will act and Winifred intends to design his costumes. His contract with Lasky is up in January, and by that time he will have his own company duly organized and under way. Rodolfo made quite a hit on the boulevards. He kissed the hands of all the European ladies present, and Winifred, smiling with her startling red lips from her dead white face, allowed her hands to be kissed in faultless Parisian manner. They made deep impressions on crowds of Parisian celebretieh, who considered them .sharply different from the previous visitors from Hollywood who did not know how to eat, or talk, or bow or smile. Rudy and his wife have the grand manner, as if they were brought up in the world of cosmopolitan society.

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1921 – Film Still’s from Four Horsemen

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