Posts Tagged With: Rudolph Valentino

7 May 1970

1970.PNG

Categories: Uncategorized | Tags:

2 Apr 1922 – F. C. Parker to Invite Gloria Swanson and R. Valentino to Come Here

In a bid to advertise his movie theater and the latest movie starring Rudolph Valentino and Gloria Swanson F.C. Parker will visit the Lasky Studios in Hollywood, where he will conduct an interview with Rudolph Valentino and Gloria Swanson in an endeavor to have them visit Stockton personally while the film in which they costar, ‘‘Beyond the Rocks,” is playing at the Lyric theater, Frank C. Parker, manager of the house, departed for the south yesterday. Mr. Parker plans to he in the vicinity of Los Angeles for a week at least. During his absence Mark Hatch will manage the Lyric Theater.

Categories: Uncategorized | Tags: , ,

1925 – Miss Hattie Wilson Tabourne, Hollywood Hairdresser

33333.PNG

Blog readers are asking themselves who is Miss Hattie Wilson Tabourne? Simple, she was a famous Hollywood African American hairdresser whose artistic hairdressing skill was a major contribution to the movie industry and the careers of many Silent Film Stars in early twentieth century, Hollywood.

agnes.PNGhattiecreation.PNG

Miss Hattie came from a very humble background in Nebraska.  As a young child, her family discovered she had a gift for hair dressing, and it was that talent that eventually led her to being discovered while working at a downtown Los Angeles Hairdressing establishment.  Miss Hattie’s discovery led to a long-term contract working as a hairdresser for Famous Players-Lasky Studio and the rest is true Hollywood history.  During her time, in Hollywood she styled the hair of Agnes Ayres, Dorothy Dalton, Nita Naldi, Cecil B. DeMille, Leatrice Joy, Lillian Rich, Pola Negri, Gloria Swanson, Rudolph Valentino during his movie “Blood and Sand”.

rv.PNG55555.PNG

On 21 Mar 1923, Miss Hattie’s name was in the major papers as the creator of Gloria Swanson’s hairstyle called ‘Gloria’s Bob’.  While working at Famous Players-Lasky Studios, she had the additional responsibility of training future hairdressers.  On 23 Mar 1925, Miss Hattie died on an operating room table from complications as a result from a surgical procedure.  At the time of her death, she was survived by a son.  Miss Hattie is  buried next to her mother at Evergreen Cemetery, Los Angeles. CA.

Categories: Uncategorized | Tags: , ,

21 oct.PNG

Categories: Uncategorized | Tags:

29 Apr 1922

29apr22.PNG

Categories: Uncategorized | Tags:

28 Apr 1946 – Jail Psuedo Valentino Widow

HOLLYWOOD—Mrs. Marion Wilson, 37. self-declared widow of Rudolph Valentino, was jailed today for failure to appear in court on a drunk charge

Categories: Uncategorized | Tags: ,

13 Feb 1927 – Sign of Envy

Capture.PNG

What makes a love affair that is talked about from one end of the country to another?  The principals must of course be prominent.  The man is handsome and the woman beautiful, why that helps.  But when I think back over the love affairs that have had the most public attention, that have seemed to be the most envied.  Winifred Hudnut and Rudolph Valentino were the sort of couple who ought to fall in love with each other and they did madly.  The Rudolph Valentino fans breathed a heavy sigh of envy and within a few months they martially separated, and Rudolph was explaining in public that his wife wanted a career, whereas he wanted a home and children. In a word, what I remember is these famous love affairs is that they all ended unhappily. That is the type of great love? Does the romantic thing consider the real thing die in few months?  Is it true that a passion makes a poor beginning for a marriage? I am sure that the answer is No.  I am so sure that a mutual passion is the best beginning for a marriage.  I am sure the basis of the marriages I mentioned was a powerful attraction which passed because it failed to develop into the real thing. We all make a distinction, though we do not all use the same words for it, between the physical and spiritual between love and passion it should prefer to make the distinction between passion and tenderness.  Love requires both to be complete.  Everyone has felt the physical attraction which is the basis of passion and the most usual beginning of love. But when you stop to analyze it, you will see a physical attraction is a comparatively impersonal thing. If you are at all aware of your wisdom of marrying a person of about our own age, of similar background, taste and ambition rather than sone who is much older or younger, or from a very different social environment, or with a different attitude toward life.  But physical attraction is no respecter of wisdom.  Perhaps that hidden part of ourselves, the primitive part which we all conceal even from our own minds is obedient to what civilization expects of us, every man is physically attracted to every woman and vice versa.  We do not permit ourselves in recognizing it unless it has some suitability.  Passion is almost impersonal in its beginning such as the case of Rudolph Valentino and Natacha Rambova. That we force it to be personal. We control it, stamp it out, unless the person for whom we feel passion, or the possibility of passion meets some of our other demands.  What happens to a physical attraction is marriage? The same thing that happens to any other physical desire, it dies of its own gratification until its renewed.  There are happy and loving marriages in which there are no children. But I doubt if there is any happier surgery for a marriage, any better any promise, this is not a passing fancy but the real thing, then the actual desire for children or purely rational grounds it may be argued that there are already plenty of people in the world.  Adding to the number is taking on a responsibility for which nobody is every likely to thank you. It is perfectly true it is difficult to experience and trying to the nerves to have children. Nevertheless, people who love want children. People who love usually to do have children. Love which result in children are at least three times as likely to become big loves as those that do not.

Categories: Uncategorized | Tags: ,

Capture.PNG

Categories: Uncategorized | Tags: ,

43-053.jpg

Categories: Uncategorized | Tags: ,

pa.PNG

Categories: Uncategorized | Tags: ,

cant blame.PNG

Categories: Uncategorized | Tags: ,

23 Apr 1922 – Late Movie News

Paramount and Rudolph Valentino have no corner on the sheik market, if they did make the tribe popular. John Davidson has a role of the sheik in Pricilla Dean’s “Under Two Flags”. He is one of the players in “Fools Paradise”.

Categories: Uncategorized | Tags: ,

22 Apr 1982

22 apr 1982.png

Categories: Uncategorized | Tags:

20 Apr 1938 – Incidents about Film Stars Recalled

Memories that bless and burn:  When an Eastern Society Woman Introduced herself to Rudolph Valentino at the Coconut Grove and offered him $5,000 to teach her to tango.

Categories: Uncategorized | Tags:

Apr 1923 – Valentino Charm Wins Elmira New York Fans

Advertising a beauty clay, rather than the latest kind of Vaseline Rudolph Valentino “The Perfect Lover” charmed a goodly crowd of his feminine admirers at the Armory Thursday evening.  Charmed is the word for the youthful Sheik of the movies, sleep and well-mannered, radiant with the fire of youth handsome in the extreme, and attired in the costume in which he first came into fame was a real Prince Charming as he danced with the beautiful Winifred Hudnut, now Mrs. Valentino No.2 on the raised platform in the center of the Armory Floor.  Rudy’s following is feminine there is no denying that, for how else would he acquire the title “The Perfect Lover” and is that not sufficient to line up the menfolk as his mortal enemies? It is safe to say that many of the male gender present Thursday night under protest maybe and who went to scoff were won to the ranks of Valentino fans. For Rudy certainly made a good impression though rather stingy in his dancing act.  “It was a long wait for the advent of the Sheik, but the womenfolk thought it worthwhile, and loudly and convincingly did they voice their welcome when Rudolph and his wife made their appearance at 9:30 pm.  Preceded by their own Argentine Orchestra, the noted pair, attired in the costume so well remembered in “The Four Horsemen” danced the Argentine Tango, a replica of the scene from the famous Ingram picture. With Sombrero, sash, velvet and gold boots and spurs, Valentino appeared as he did in his first big picture, and the scene in the darkened Armory with the spotlight playing on the raised platform, was unique and delightful. Valentino began as a tango dancer and Thursday nights exhibition showed he lost none of his nimbleness.  So appealing was the applause that Valentino and his wife consented to an encore, after which the hero of the screen proved his versatility by making a speech.  Perfectly at ease, with an Italian accent Valentino took the occasion to denounce what he termed the “picture trust” which he declared was responsible for the fact he was not now appearing in movies.  “It was not a case salary with me but rather one of self-respect for I was not willing to appear in the sort of pictures, which the trust insisted I should make.  Pictures such as the “Sheik, Young Rajah, and others of this caliber are not the sort in which I care to appear.  Valentino himself, he was voted every bit as handsome off the screen as on, and even the men declared him a ‘regular fellow’. Showing evidence of education and culture minus the egoism attributed to him, the former tango dancer, who rose to the exalted position of “worlds most romantic figure” as the program termed him, the young lothario bids fair to hold his present popularity. For whom else would the women fold wait for two hours. Because of the crowd in front of the Armory Valentinos party entered by a side door only to be met with shrieks of delight as he stepped out into the hall.  He certainly gave em a big thrill.  Running Valentino to a close second for honors was the orchestra which he brought with him and Mrs. Valentino a chilly third.  Billed as an Argentines orchestra and attired in gypsy costume, they made a picturesque appearance. Their music proved a delight, especially when they played for the local dancers and they were roundly applauded.  The hall was decorated in American and Italian flags.  The crowd, no so large as anticipated appeared to have enjoyed its evening.

Categories: Uncategorized | Tags: ,

4 apr 20.PNG

Categories: Uncategorized | Tags: ,

12apr.PNGCapture.PNG

Categories: Uncategorized | Tags:

15 Apr 1924 – Movie Star Taxes

15 apr.PNG

Categories: Uncategorized | Tags: ,

15 apr 23.PNG

Categories: Uncategorized | Tags:

1919

Scarlet_Days_1919.jpg

Although Rudolph Valentino did not appear in this film. D.W. Griffith did give him a screen test. I think he would of been a perfect fit in this film.

Categories: Uncategorized | Tags:

Blog at WordPress.com.

%d bloggers like this: