Posts Tagged With: Winifred De Wolfe

1937

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Robert Mac Cameron, Early Twenty Century Portrait Painter

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Born on 14 January 1866, Robert Mac Cameron, was the son of Thomas McConnell who was a newspaper publisher and a elected official in Winneconne, Wisconsin. Also, his grandmother was a first cousin to Robert E. Lee.   A noted artist he changed his name in order to make his own name and way.  In early twenty century, most painters of the day, would move to New York, London or Paris to find inspiration and fame in their art.  Mac Cameron had studios in all three locations. In 1908, he received a medal for his work titled “A Group of Friends” and won prizes for his exhibition for “Waiting for the Doctor”.  However, it was his greatest fame as a portrait painter whose work today hangs in famous art museums all around the world.  In 1912, Mac Cameron painted society beauty Winifred de Wolfe whose painting was considered the embodiment of a certain type of fragile girlish charm and the portrait won accolades.

19122.PNGAlso, he was a great friend of Robert Winthrop Chanler, whose grandmother was Mrs. William Astor. On 29 Dec 1912, he died in New York City of heart disease surrounded by his wife and children.  At the time of his death, it was reported his estate retained the painting. However, I recently discoved the above painting by Robert Lee MacCameron was gifted to the Utah Museum of Fine Arts by her mother.  The painting hung in the museum for years until a recent renovation and its currently in storage.

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1912

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1914

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9 July 1916

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1917

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1913

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1913 – Winifred de Wolfe/Natacha Rambova

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13 June 1916 – Disappearance of Winifred De Wolfe

The strange disappearance of Winifred de Wolfe is greatly worrying her friends and relatives here where she was born and spent a great deal of her childhood.  Though leaving Salt Lake City when a youngster, there are many of the old friends of her parents who have seen her in San Francisco where she resided for years.  She is a beauty in every sense of the word, flowerlike in her loveliness, and has the brains air and breeding which distinguished her parents. Her father was the late Colonel Shaughnessy and her mother Winifred Kimball Shaugnessy a vivacious beauty who spent most of her time here until she married de Wolfe a San Francisco Hotel man.

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12 June 1916

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10 June 1916

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5 June 1912

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1916

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13 Mar 1923 – Rudolph Valentino Married in Crown Point

The Crown Point marriage mill cut another notch in the hall of public fame on Wednesday afternoon when Rudolph Valentino and Miss Winifred De Wolfe, with a party of friends from New York and Chicago journeyed to the famous “Gretna Green” and were married by Justice of the Peace Howard Kemp. After securing the necessary license at the county clerk’s office, in which Valentino gave his name as Rudolph Gugliemi, aged 28, and his bride as Winifred De Wolfe, aged 26.  the couple went immediately to the office of Judge Kemp and the ring ceremony was performed which made them man and wife. Several witnesses were present at the marriage ceremony and those signing their marriage certificate were Attorney Michael Romona, of Chicago, Mr. and Mrs. Arthur Butler Graham, of New York, and Mrs. Welner, of Salt Lake City, Utah.  Judge Theodore Klotz, of Hammond, a friend of the party accompanied them to Crown Point.  When it became noised about that the famous screen artists were in the city, a crowd quickly gathered curious to see Valentino and his bride and they were given an impromptu ovation and showered with congratulations as the party started Chicago-ward after the ceremony.   Following the marriage, the news was flashed to the press of the world and once again Crown Point gets into the limelight as being the scene of the marriage of famous folk. Valentino, while going through the ceremony appeared as nervous as any country swain that ever took the important step and there was nothing about his appearance during the ceremony that bore out world-wide reputation of being the cool, calm deliberate and “perfect lover” of screen fame.

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Mar 1916 – Famous Russian Dancer Theodore Kosloff Sues Mrs. de Wolfe

Mrs. Winifred de Wolfe was sued for approximately $2,000 which he said is due him in payment for dance lessons and gowns furnished her daughter. Mr. George Battle, the de Wolfe attorney said that Miss de Wolfe told her mother that is she would pay the claim she would not see Kosloff anymore, but Mrs. de Wolfe remained adamant because she contended the claim was unjust.

 

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10 Jun 1916 – Roses Tossed to Russian Dancer Bear the Name of Missing Heiress Winifred de Wolfe

A flock of detectives took up the trail today of Miss de Wolfe the missing San Francisco heiress While a frantic mother accused dancer Theodore Kosloff, of using hypnotism on his pupil. Just at the end of Kosloff’s act at a local theater this afternoon a huge bouquet of American Beauty roses was tossed across the footlights by an attendant. It was tied with a big black bow of material that looked like undertakers crepe. Kosloff picked up the bouquet and pricked his fingers on the thorns. Blood sprinkled on the attached card on which was inscribed in her own handwriting “Winifred de Wolfe”. Investigation as to the source of the bouquet proved futile. The girl’s relatives however are certain now that she is alive. Kosloff declared this was the message he had vaguely expected and consented to issue his long-promised statement. “I hope” he said, “that when Miss de Wolfe reads the statements about Kosloff made to the newspaper by her mother she will immediately if she is alive, send a denial to the newspapers. That’s why for the time I have refrained from speaking on the subject. I consider Winifred de Wolfe what in my language would be called a saint, and only her great love for art, which is almost fanatical, would compel, her to leave her mother, her home, relatives and friends”. Winifred de Wolfe, has been missing since 26 April. The Russian Ambassador, Senator James O’Gorman, and Secret Service men have at various times joined in the search for her. Miss de Wolfe is the niece of famous NY Interior Designer Elsie De Wolfe.

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1922 – Bride of Mystery

Winifred Hudnut. daughter of Richard Hudnut. the perfume magnate, was his choice. She was a girl of mystery, for it was not known generally that the Hudnut’s had a daughter. The girl had appeared in the films as Natacha Rambova, a protégé of Nazimova, in whose company Valentino had been featured. They were wed In Mexicali, Mexico, at a party, with the municipal band and a reception by the local government. Then came a crash that quite drowned the sonorous music, for it was learned that Rodolph’s divorce would not be permanent until next January and he was promptly arrested for bigamy and jailed when he returned to Los Angeles. Friends supplied bail and he was finally extricated but legally declared unwed.  He was freed only on condition that he restrain himself and live apart from his quasi-wife until the decree became permanent and this he promised. Meanwhile, Miss Hudnut’s history was investigated and It came out that she was merely an adopted daughter of the Hudnuts; that she was really Winifred De Wolfe, a relative of Elsie De Wolfe, and that she had mysteriously disappeared eight years ago, to be discovered in the company of Theodore Kosloff, the Russian dancer, under the name of Vera Fredow.  The bridegroom remained in Los Angeles, the bride hastened to New York and Jean Acker, near-wife, laughed generously, and said “My marriage was a romantic tragedy of the silver screen. Our happiness has been shattered, but I still admire Rodolph. I can’t say that I love him, but he Is a wonderful actor. He and Miss Hudnut have my sympathy and I bear them no malice. As for me I’m trying to forget.” But Valentino assorted proudly last week that Winifred Hudnut would be his forever despite the law, and he added “I’m going to Paris In March, when I have my final decree of divorce. My wife? If she is my wife will leave New York with her parents for Nice soon. When we meet again. It will be in Paris, and we will be married. “Then we will get married in every State of the Union, if necessary. After that, we will settle down in Hollywood in the home that I have provided for my bride the home that she has never occupied. Of course, my wife will continue with her art work. She has designed many of the costumes in my recent pictures. A woman has the right to a career outside of marriage but she cannot devote herself to a career and to marriage  successfully and at the same time.” And In the meantime, Hollywood Is awaiting the sound of the next marital cataclysm in its midst for there always seems to be one ready for the spark that precedes the explosion.

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