88.PNG

Categories: Uncategorized | Tags: ,

15 Sep 1924 – NY Gossip

Capture.PNG

Categories: Uncategorized | Tags: , , ,

gs22.PNG

Categories: Uncategorized | Tags:

26.PNG

Categories: Uncategorized | Tags:

gs2.PNG

Categories: Uncategorized | Tags:

rip.PNG

Categories: Uncategorized | Tags:

rnat.PNG

Categories: Uncategorized | Tags: ,

10 YEARS.PNG

Categories: Uncategorized | Tags: , ,

11.PNG

Categories: Uncategorized | Tags:

5 Sep 1937 – 11th Anniversary of the Death of Rudolph Valentino

Last week’s pilgrimage by 1000 devoted fans to the crypt of the late Rudolph Valentino, on the occasion of the 11th anniversary of this death, will indicate how firmly intrenched a great actor can become in the hearts of his admirers. He is still fondly remembered by thousands, not merely residents of Hollywood but by great numbers in far-flung parts of the world. Each year, when the day of the star’s death comes, hundreds visit his resting place in a lovely corner of the Cathedral mausoleum at Hollywood Cemetery. This year’s group of worshippers was the largest. Fans remembered that Valentino’s favorite flower was the red rose, and the offerings which banked his crypt on his death anniversary were predominantly of this bloom. Worshipers who never forget, year after year, include his first wife Jean Acker; his brother, Alberto Valentino, Mrs. Emma Leutgeb and Mrs. Fanny Lichtenfeld. Mrs. Leutgeb living in Salzburg, Austria and Mrs. Lichtenfeld living in Richmond, Virginia annual send the cemetery money for bouquets of red roses. Faithful memorial groups which also sent flowers were the British Valentino Memorial Guild and the Chicago Valentino Memorial Club.

Categories: Uncategorized | Tags: , ,

1913-1916 – Surviving in NY by Rudolph Valentino

In 1913, life as an Italian immigrant living in New York City was very hard. Upon my arrival from Italy, I was overwhelmed by everyone else who was arriving from other countries who had the same dream as me. I did not know the language and relied on the Italian Community to help with obtaining a job, food, and housing. While I can honestly claim I was not good with money then and now. There is a certain humbleness when you relive memories of how life began here. Oftentimes I was hungry and spent many lonely nights without a roof over my head, shame and remorse-these comprised the cross of my humiliation. My false pride was grounded mercilessly to bits then utterly pulverized. I was kicked out of one lodging after another changing rooms four or five times over two months. Sometimes my clothing in lieu of payment. Sometimes I pawned my things in order to have a hot meal or a bath. One hot day I walked five miles to city hall looking for work and turn down then walked five miles back to my room.

My last room was a cubby hole cost me two dollars a week. I went to the Mills Hotel and got a room for 12 cents for one night only. The food was plain and plentiful. This hotel was built in 1907, and most guests were like me doing what they could to survive like countless others.  The next night I slept in Central Park. I looked for work every day. Usually I did not get it, sometimes I made 50 cents by shining the brass on cars, or by doing anything that anyone would allow me to do. I was above no work.

Categories: Uncategorized | Tags: | Leave a comment

10 Apr 30 Police Tips for Valentino Funeral.JPG

Categories: Uncategorized | Tags: ,

rx1.PNG

rx2.PNG

Categories: Uncategorized | Tags: ,

Sep 1928 – When is a Story Stolen?

All right sue me! is the catchword with which members of the scenario department at Lasky Studios greet each other nowadays! Plagarism suits have become such an expense item on move budget books that many companies send back all orginial manuscripts unopened. After a picture is released the producers are flooded with letters typewritten on business stationery, scrawled with a pencil on cheap lined paper penned in violet ink and scented with Night of Love perfume, but one and all declaring “you’ve stolen my movie plot”.  Each case that is taken to court costs the studio about fifteen hundrend dollars in lawyers fees and wastes several weeks of valuable time, though complaining authors seldom win their cases. the damages asked vary.  A shoe clerk who sent in a story about young love and has afterward seen a picture of young love on the screen may deman five thousand dollars but he is usually willing to settle for a couple of hundred out of court.  Scenario editor Edward Montaigne has handled tons of scripts submitted by amateur writers, each of who claims to have a new idea.  He is a married man, everyone who meets him wants to tell a plot.  Sometimes he admits astonishing ideas are presented to him. For example, there is a spiritualist who is in constant communication with Rudolph Valentino. In the spirit world she writes Rudie has met Edith Cavell, who insists that he must make one more picture on earth. For a consideration, she will sell Valentino’s services to Universal Studio to write and direct a movie.

Categories: Uncategorized | Tags:

sep.PNG

Categories: Uncategorized | Tags:

31 Aug 1924 – Valentino Return to Screen Romance

Fascinating Film Lover — New Picture Has Three Distinct Love Sequences. When it was finally decided that Rodolph Valentino was to return to Paramount after a lone and universally regretted absence from the motion picture screen, it was with the utmost care that the executives of the company set themselves to the task of choosing a vehicle which would be in keeping with the importance of the event. Recalling the great Valentino successes, it seemed desirable that the picture should com bine, if possible, the love interest of The Sheik, the romantic coloring of Blood and Sand, and the spectacle of The Four Horseman. So Monsieur Beaucaire, Booth Tarkington’s story, with its romantic, colorful, and spectacular back ground of the Court of King Louis XV. of France, was chosen. Monsieur. Beaucaire is unquestionably one of the greatest romances ever written. Most of the action takes place at the Court of King Louis XV. of France, and in Bath, England, the
favorite resort of the English nobility at that time. The characters portrayed are almost all real ones, who had a hand in the making of history, such as Mms. Pompadour, the Due de Richelieu, Lord Chesterfield, Beau Nash and others. Briefly told, the story Is of the young and attractive Due de Chartres, Who, refusing to marry al most on sight the charming Princess de Bourbon-Conti, at the Royal command, incurs the disfavor of the King and Mme. Pompadour, the power behind the throne, and is forced to flee from the country. Reaching England he masquerades as a barber under the name of Monsieur Beaucaire, Falling in with an English nobleman of French descent, who knows neither who Beaucaire is, nor why he is in England,he gains access to the English Court, and meets and captivates the fascinating Lady Mary Carlisle, only to have her turn against him when she finds he is an impostor. A message from the French King, bidding him to return to France arid, be
forgiven, takes him back to the Princess whom he really loves. Thus Valentino is provided with an opportunity for three separate and distinct love sequences, and in them Rodolph is said to prove that he has not lost any of the ability to make love which has made him one of the most fascinating and compelling screen stars of to-day. ‘High powered’ is the term applied to these love scenes by the studio officials during the making of the picture.
Categories: Uncategorized | Tags:

30 Aug 1926 – Bowed by Brief Farewell of Lonely Actress

“I am only a little butterfly made for sunshine. I cannot stand loneliness and shabblness with nobody to care for me and with no babies to love.” “Please look after Rudolph’s pictures. He helped me over lots of stiles unknowingly.” This was the farewell message of Miss Peggy Scott, the fascinating young actress, in ‘bequeathing photographs of Rudolph Valentino to Miss Rosa Alborough, her friend, who gave her a night’s lodgings before she committed suicide. In giving evidence at the inquest, Miss Alborough said that Miss Scott came to her flat. She was penniless, and said that she was unable to get work or a room. She stayed the night, and visited a moving picture show in the afternoon, “When she returned in the evening she was crying. She collapsed, saying that she had swallowed “something.” Miss Scott died a few minutes after the arrival of the doctor, she left a letter, in a bag addressed to “witness. “My life is awful,” wrote Miss Scott. “I am afraid of it. I am simply existing. It is heartbreaking living in the past when the present is hopeless. I broke my heart. Budolph helped me to carry on, and told me of his own sufferings. A MATTER OF TIME. “With his death the last bit of courage has flown. I have been stretched for years like a piece of elastic. Perhaps it was only a matter of time, anyway, before the elastic snapped.” Miss Scott apologised to her friend would not allow her death to interfere with her holiday. She mentioned a man friend who forgiving her trouble, and hoped she used to make her an allowance, and gave him a blessing. She hoped he would pay the funeral expenses. “I am sur£ he will help. It is for the last time,” concluded in her letter, ‘Miss Alborough told the Coroner that she was paying the funeral expenses. The inquest was adjourned till October
Categories: Uncategorized | Tags:

30 Aug 1926

photo035small.jpg

Categories: Uncategorized | Tags:

28 Aug 1922 – Moran of the Lady Letty

It will be with great delight that the picture patrons will welcome the return of Rudolph Valentino. There no doubt he scored a wonderful tiiiocese in “The Sheik, and the triumph of that picture was merely illustrative of the personality of the star Valcntino is the featured player in “Moran of Lady Letty,” which commences at The Wondergraph today. The dramatic of this picture are intense, the acting of Dorothy Dalton is well worthy of commendation. One is the stanch windjammer overcome by the dread sea-fire, the looting of the doomed vessel, and the rescue of the unconscious girl by the shanghaied second mate. Exciting episodes are the battle between the crew of tile Lady Leity and the Mexican brigands, the subdoling of the untamed nature of Moran. The tremendous fight between the dandy and the villainous captain a fight in which the vtuecr of oivilUatiou id stripped I awayt a battle of brute furoe raging beyond the rocks and finally on the main in the high seas ending only with the ships captain dying.
Categories: Uncategorized | Tags: , ,

27 Aug 1926- Valentino Dead America in Mourning

Rudolph Valentino died on Monday. Not since the death of the three American Presidents Roosevelt, Wilson and Harding has there been in the present generation such country-wide public manifestations of grief over the demise of any person as that of Valentino. Newspapers through out the nation in headlines, in many cases six inches high state “United States Mourns Valentino”. Many journals devote half their contents to pictures of the cinema star from baby-hood to man-hood and long accounts of his life career even stressing that he was not and American and his residence in this country was brief, having arrived penniless and for many years earned his living at the most menial tasks.  He was unquestionably the most popular state figure in America. One writer declares Valentino was more popular the world over than any King who ever lived.  Hundreds of thousands of people literally blocked the street around the hospital for 24 hours before his death. An appeal was broadcast over the radio for helpful thought when his condition became serious. Thousands of messages a day poured in from people, while floral contributions filed the corridors of the hospital. His death cast a gloom on the bright lights of Broadway the famous NY theatre district.
Categories: Uncategorized | Tags:

333.PNG

Categories: Uncategorized | Tags:

Capture.PNG

Categories: Uncategorized | Tags:

1926 – Valentino Tribute

s-l1600.jpg

Categories: Uncategorized | Tags:

1926 – Monthly Barometer

Following the death of beloved Rudolph Valentino this department received an avalanche of letters expressing the deal and sincere sorrow of the movie fans. The letters following Valentino’s death received during August outnumbered thhoe on any other topic.

Categories: Uncategorized | Tags:

photoplay3031movi_0489.jpg

Categories: Uncategorized | Tags:

Powered by WordPress.com.

%d bloggers like this: