20 May 1922 – All Will Be Well

Winifred “Shaughnessy” Hudnut, bride of Rudolph Valentino, passed through here this morning bound for New York. In a long letter to her new husband, she stated “everything will come out all right and I will be with you shortly.”

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31 Jan 1924 – Writer Leaves for Europe

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8 Mar 1926 – What If?

What if Rudy Valentino married Pola Negri, Winifred Hudnut hopes he will buy the bride pretty things. Lawyers’ bills prevented Winifred from having real jewels when she was Mrs. Rudy, she says, and he never mentioned his passion for a family. Pola loves Rudy, she has said at Los Angeles, but is waiting to see if her affections are the same when she returns from Europe four months hence.

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17 May 1937

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16 May 1919 – Theater Notes

A Russian star, a French director, an American scenario writer and Italian camera man and a Chinese story are the chief factors in the colossal Nazimova production, “The Red Lantern,” starring Nazimova herself, which was produced in this city at a cost of over a quarter of a million dollars and which will be shown at the California. Nazimova is a daughter of Russia; her director, M, Albert Capellani, is French —for a number of years the most noted of all cinema directors in Paris, with Pathe; June Mathis, gifted American woman writer, prepared the scenario; camera man, Eugene Gaudio, is Italian, and the story, from the novel by Edith Wherry, is laid in an Oriental setting.

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“Fame is like a giant x-ray. Once you are exposed beneath it, the very beatings of your heart are shown to a gaping world.” — Natacha Rambova, December 1922.

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14 May 1927 – Pola Negri Marries Her “Greatest Love”

France, Pola Negri became Princess Mdlvani this afternoon at 5 o’clock in the little city hall of this small french town when she was married to Prince Serge Mdivani, a brother-in-law of Mae Murray.  Pola’s husband, she announced several days ago on arriving, is her ‘‘greatest love,” greater even than Rudolph Valentino. Charlie Chaplin or her first husband, who was a Count. Pola and Serge were childhood sweethearts, she said, and the Prince was urging his love upon the film beauty even before Valentino.  We are sure that Rudy if he was still alive would wish her well.

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25 Feb 1923 – Lolling Luxuriously at The Blackstone Hotel, Chicago Valentino Announces He’s Financially Broke

According to the standards that prevail among the stars of movie-land Rodolph Valentino is broke. He admitted it to the writer while reclining on a divan in his luxurious suite at the Blackstone Hotel which suggested anything but flatness of the pocketbook. He had just finished a “turn” at the Marigold Dance Hall, where he and his new wife have been working to keep the wolf from the door. “I may be broke” where his exact words, “but I will go back to polishing golf sticks if that is what I did before I became a movie actor before I will work again for the people who want me to grind out movie pictures like sausages”. “What if you lose your suit” I asked. “I will stay out of pictures for two years until my contract expires and then come back in bigger ones than ever”.  Looking back upon an hour spent with Valentino over a cigar and some delightful prohibition beverage that suggested the flavor of old Scotch it dawns on me that most of the talk as about the star’s lawsuit against his former employers Famous Players-Lasky. How he made millions of dollars for them and how they paid him a paltry $1200 a week when Mary Miles Minter, the “synthetic Mary Pickford” was drawing down $8000 in her weekly pay envelope and Dorothy Dalton was depositing $5000 to her bank account 52 times a year.  ” I was the biggest drawing card they had and they paid me less”, he complained with that modesty so characteristic of the actor and yet it didn’t sound immodest coming from Valentino because it was the simple truth. “Why did they treat you like that”? Rodolph admitted that he had been seduced to signing a three year contract that gave the producers all the best of it but the reason he did it because they told him it was “just like Thomas Meighans contract”. So he won’t work for them and they won’t let him make pictures for anybody else. They won’t let him appear on the stage either.  The astute contract-makers, however seemed to have overlooked dance halls and the guiles Rodolph, having been stung once, hired himself a lawyer who pointed out the way for him to make a living for himself and his young bridge Winifred Hudnut Valentino until the suit was settled. So he has been appearing here this week at the biggest and newest dance hall on the south side and turning them away although the hall accommodates 8000 people.  “They were packed in so tight last night” said Valentino with enthusiasm “that they couldn’t move then hands to applaud when my wife and I finished our dance”. That sounds like a new alibi but again it was only the truth. The act may have been a divver in Detroit but it went big here.  Valentino shies at all women these days.  The lady reporter send to interview him came back with a report Valentino said over the telephone he did not have time for an interview.  He was profuse in his apologies to me later and said he did not recall having refused an interview to a newspaper person “it must have been my manager who answered the telephone but usually it was no one he knew.  Once I heard him say “Mrs. Vernon Castle? But my dear lady I happen to know she is playing in Los Angeles? They use all kinds of names that think will attract my attention” said Valentino.  “It’s any wonder if sometimes I should refuse to see a real newspaper woman by mistake?.  George Melford, the director dropped by to say hello to Valentino on his way to the coast. It so happened we both reached for the door at the same time.  “Here is the man who directed me in “The Sheik” Valentino explained to me by way of introduction. “But I have forgiven him for it and it was a great money maker thee million dollars but oh, what a picture”.  Valentino made it plain that the kind of character his portrayal of “The Sheik” fastened on him was another source of his grudge against Famous Players. I It created the impression that I was an oriental sort of person who smoked perfumed cigarettes and reveled in the society of women, where as a matter of fact I smoke any kind of cigarette I can get and I like the society of men.  While Valentino was lambasting “The Sheik” so vociferously the man who directed him only grinned.  “You are looking fine Rudy”, George interrupted at last.  “Feeling pretty fit”? “Never felt better”, Rudy with his most charming smile, and weigh 135.  “He gives the impression in pictures of being larger”.  “What is my ambition? To make better and better pictures giving a different characterization to each. Next, I would like to play Don Ceaser de Bazen. There is a part that has been played on the stage by all the great actors in recent times, Booth, Barrett, Salvini, Mansfield actors I know couldn’t touch by a hundred miles but I would like to do my best.”
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11 May 1957 – Valentino Memorial North Hollywood Church

A church dedicated to the memory of the late Silent Film superstar Rudolph Valentino has been opened here.  The opening service of the “Valentino Memorial Church of Psychic Fellowship” was conducted on a recent Sunday evening.  The program ncluded piano selections from music used in Valetnino’s last movie “The Son of the Sheik”.

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27 Apr 1930 – Life Secrets of Valentino Revealed

Valentino was never given credit for the real art he had. His unusual abilities were neglected to emphasize the grosser side – sex appeal, women, night life, flirtations – anything that would create a wider shop girl public and a few thousand more fans.  This forced him into a role he hated to play, a role in which he was unhappy.  But Hollywood gossip accomplished its aim.  Rudy was too young to realize how stupid public criticism is. He was too young for the fame that came to him. In his forties or fifties, perhaps, he might have stood up against that tidal wave of adulation and flattery, but in his twenties it wasn’t human not to be broken by it. The accumulation of it all warped his entire personality until, eventually it made him ashamed of the that finer side of his nature, not seen or understood.  This is the essence of his tragedy, as I shall try to make clear. People who knew him on the screen were invariable surprised when they met him in private life to discover what the real man was like.  If they expected to find the sheik they were disappointed. Recently, I met in London a well-born Englishwoman whose hero he had been for years. She said, she had dreamed of him; she was crazy over him. This woman said to me “when I met Valentino himself, I was amazed to find not my romantic hero, but just a boy quite frank sincere. Why, he is only a child. At first, I was disillusioned, but in another way I liked him the more”.  There were two distinct Valentinos the artist and the man. The one was swashbuckling cavalier who flashed across the screen into the hearts of millions. The other was a simple boy with a childish sensitiveness often mistaken for weakness by the undiscerning and the prejudiced American men, particular, had no use for him. They looked down on him and criticized which hurt terribly, for he was pitifully anxious to be liked and respected. Had they taken the pains to know him, they would have given both; he couldn’t talk business, politics or the stock exchange.  He had no mentality for such things. They lay beyond his grasp because he had utterly no interest in them. If I, myself tried to talk business I couldn’t get his attention. He would be thinking how handsome his horse would look in his new silver trappings from Mexico, or how much speed he could get from his new motor car.  He had a mania for motors.  He would rather lie under an automobile in a pair of greasy overalls, tinkering with the engine, than go dancing at a night club with the most attractive woman in the world.  Cultured, cosmopolitan men liked his finer side and the self-styled hundred percent American with his lack of culture and his one-track mind wrote him down as a weakling and looked to find nothing good in him.  All the romance and attraction association with his name, and which men of this type so resented, lay only in his acting.  In reality they resented it because it was a charm they so sadly lacked.  The trouble with Rudy was, he lived a few hundred years too late.  He should have been born in the middle ages, where men wore armor and fought duels and won their spurs by riding a horse into battle to fight for a principle. There was nothing in the coward in the physical sense of the word.  Yes, there were two sides but he had a sense of fun, but no humor. He couldn’t stand flippant criticism of his acting.  He welcomed the serious constructive kind, but the mash notes how he despised them. I have seen him pitch them all into the fire swearing vociferously the while. Later, when they came in tons, his secretaries took charge of them and showed only the intelligent ones which he answered personally. When he was making a picture nothing else existed.  He didn’t act the part he lived it.  The character he was portraying was a personality with which he identified himself, until he became its living entity. It was as though he made that character a shell into which he stepped, with all its mental workings and physical habits. This transfiguration began when he started studying the script and continued until the last camera shot was finished.  Then he discarded the shell and became Rudolph Valentino again.  When in “Blood and Sand” he was playing the role of Gallardo the toreador of the peasant class, he discarded all his fine manners to assume those of a peasant. He ate like a peasant and walked like none.  While doing the early part of the picture where Gallardo is a young boy Rudy was impish and prankish about the house.  He laughed and mental reactions were those of a boy of 13. He was not a great actor in the sense of Sara Bernhardt or Edwin Booth.  Sarah Bernhardt intelligently studied a role until her brain dictated the emotions.  Rudy couldn’t get anything in his brain until he had first felt it emotionally.  He had no initiative quality but startling dramatic ability that absorbed everything about a role to the most detailed mannerisms.  In his movie “Monsieur Beaucaire” he would take a pinch of snuff he intuitively knew these things. I felt Rudy was psychic as we both discovered and his extreme sensitiveness enabled him to tune in on a personality of phase of life and so interpret it faultlessly. Herein lay his genius.
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Pola Negri Receipe

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Pola Negri was not a gourmet chef nor did she know her way around the kitchen like her mother.  She was more interested in acting and her name in lights than a husband or family of her own.

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7 May 1922 -Valentino’s Hair Dressed Every Day for New Picture

It’s a tough life they lead—these men motion picture stars. But up until now they haven’t had to worry over the feminine problem of elaborate coiffures—and hairdressers. Rudolph Valentino, however, is having even this added to his list of troubles. For in ‘‘Blood and Sand,” his next Paramount picture, he plays the part of a Spanish full-fighter and all bull-fighters wear a “pigtail” that is at once the pride and bane of their existence. So every morning at the Lasky studio finds Valentino submitting to the ministrations of Hattie, the hairdresser who has been responsible for the coiffures of such noted screen beauties as Gloria Swanson, Betty Compson, Bebe Daniels, Agnes Ayres, et. al. Of course, the star had to let his hair grow very long in order to make the braid possible. Also, bullfighters have long, luxuriant sideburns and more proving that it’s a great life —this being a motion picture star.

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