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28 Jun 1931 – The Case of Why Rich Women Prefer to Divorce in Paris

This writer is going to use the divorce case of Winifred Hudnut/Natacha Rambova versus Rudolph Valentino as an example of why women prefer to divorce in Paris. So we know that Winifred/Natacha was granted a divorce in Paris simply on the fact Valentino wrote a letter to her that he definitely and purposely left her and decided to cease all relations with her. Thus she was “grossly insulted”. But lets not forget Winifred got her knickers in a twist when she was no longer Valentino’s de facto manager and barred from movie studios. Hudnut and Valentino journeyed to Paris and it was no secret they were planning to divorce. The ruling of the Seine trial was Hudnut was entitled to all of the rights of as an American because her marriage was in Crowne Point, Indiana and “gross insult” was grounds for divorce. Most French writers contend there are three grounds for divorce under French Civil Code. Grounds for divorce are innumerable: Article 229 A husband may divorce his wife on the basis of her infidelity.Article 230 A wife may divorce her husband on the basis of his infidelity. Article 231 Both spouses may reciprocally divorce each other on the basis for violence, cruelty, or gross insults.Article 232 The condemnation of one of the spouses to a corporal punishment shall be another cause for divorce. Although no local difference is suppose to exist, so as far as husband and wife are concerned French authorities contend that in the case of an indiscretion the courts always seem to look with more indulgence upon the false step of the husband than of the wife.

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Aug 1926 – Pearl Franks

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21 Nov 1924 Valentino In Dramatic Role

Dayton patrons of the Colonial Theater ought to feel very proud to know they
have been the first in the middle west to see ‘Rudolph Valentino’ newest
photoplay, “A Sainted Devil”. Even New York City has not had a chance to see
this photoplay, which, by the way, is one of the most interesting this idol
of the screen has yet made.  This is a South American picture of contrasts the
hacienda life of the Argentine contrasted with the smart social set of
Buenos Aires, the Paris of the South Americas. This picture has fire and dash with
the added charm of Valentino.
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29 Sep 1921 – Girls Had you heard? Camille has bobbed her hair

“Camille” brought up to date as the advertisements read, opened at the
Ziegfeld yesterday. It is a modern bobbed haired version of Dumas’ story,
and in my opinion in the shearing and remodeling  project has not proven
successful. You know, I don’t think you can ever make over stories like
“Camille”. You  can’t bring them up to date. You can’t transpose the coach
and four indelibly engraved upon a memory into a modern six cylinder motor car
on an black and white taxi, and get away with it. We’re not so bloody up to
date that we’re going to have our Juliet’s served to us in knickerbockers or our
Romeo’s in ‘pinch black’ coats and russet oxford. At least, I don’t believe
we are , no matter what beautiful photography or expensive settings do their
best to enhance to so-called versions of famous favorites.  Nazimova’s “Camille”
is not sincere. She does some fine acting but she is always acting. The ear you
long to shed for Dumas’ heroine of sin and sacrifice stays right in the
corner where it was before you start to view the picture.  Rudolph Valentino as
“Armand” is by all means the best bet in the film. After having witnessed
his work in “The Four Horsemen” however, it is difficult to enthuse over him as
the lover of “the lady of the Camille’s”. The production is the most
magnificent staged.  I shall be vulgar and say that producers certainly blew
themselves on the settings. They are sumptuous and exotic.  Nazimova’s
get-up is bizarre and striking.
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Blood & Sand Former Valentino Movie Co-Star

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19 Sep 1952 – Director Now Actor

George Melford who directed Rudolph Valentino in three of his greatest hits,
including “The Sheik” is playing the part of Richard Greene’s servant in
“The Bandits of Corsica”. He started his movie work in 1906 and is now 76
years old. Edward Small, who is producing the picture was Melford’s agent in
the old days.
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13 Nov 1923

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